Throwing Stones


Photo by Lauren Lu


“People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.” It’s a sentiment that everyone is familiar with. It tends to warn people against hypocrisy or mean something like don’t criticize others when you have the same faults. Hypocrisy can be anything that a person believes or preaches that doesn’t align with his own actions. Though everyone knows hypocrisy is an undesirable, insulting quality, it still surrounds us all.

Unfortunately, there are many different types of hypocrisy—religious, gender, moral, political and many more. We have all been affected by it in one way or another. I, as a South Asian female who grew up in a protective and traditional community, encounter it very often. The people in my community say they have become more modern and accepting of gender equality while living in the U.S. However, one night last summer my cousin and I wanted to drive to her house pretty late at night. All of our brothers had already left where we were and gotten to our cousin’s house just 15 minutes before, so I thought that when I asked my mom she would say yes, like she did to my brother. Yet my mom and my aunt said no, claiming it wasn’t safe for young girls to be driving around so late at night that and our brothers were allowed to go because they were boys. You can actually see hypocrisy everywhere you go.


Unfortunately, there are many different types of hypocrisy—religious, gender, moral, political and many more. We have all been affected by it in one way or another. I, as a South Asian female who grew up in a protective and traditional community, encounter it very often.

There is always that one person who wants to be the face of Christianity or Judaism or Islam, and the next minute he is doing something that he wouldn’t be proud of. We all know the story of the politician who campaigns on a promise that he so truly believes only to somehow change his mind after he is elected. I think the problem really is that many don’t realize that they are being hypocritical when they do something; they just react to a situation in the way that is the easiest. For example, when someone falls, people like to think that they would be the ones to stop and help, but when they are actually put in that situation it’s not that easy to do what they thought they would.

The only way to actually stop hypocrisy is to be aware of your own actions and actively try not to be a hypocrite. When you make decisions, wonder whether they represent what you truly believe or whether you will regret them.


Nida Khan is a staff photographer for the Acumen. The views expressed in this column do not necessarily represent the views of the Acumen or the Acumen staff. You may reach Nida at nidakhan@chsacumen.com


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Nida Khan